Danny Keane — Product Designer at Google in San Francisco
IMG_8667.jpg

San Francisco's first healthy food delivery app

This case study gives a glimpse into how I led design for the launch of our first initial product.

Introduction

Introduction

Zesty empowers companies to be healthier and more productive. Zesty's talented team creates tailored, world-class food programs for offices with 20 to 1000+ employees. Zesty works with hundreds of clients serving balanced and delicious breakfasts, lunches, dinners, happy hours and special events.

Since launching in 2013, Zesty has raised over $20M in funding from top Silicon Valley investors including Index Ventures, Founders Fund, Forerunner Ventures, SV Angel and Y Combinator.

I joined as the first hire and was apart of the founding team that later went on to participate in Y Combinator (W14).

During my time here I wore many hats but my primary focus was directing experience design across brand and product. I worked closely with founders and executives to create a vision, find product/market fit and help improve the bottom line.

This case study details the steps we took to launch our first initial product.

In early 2018, Zesty was acquired by Square (NYSE: SQ).

Understanding the palate of our demographic

Understanding the palate of our demographic

After partnering up with many of San Francisco's top restaurants, we started to define our offering. From previously conducted user research we identified that there was a large growing market for healthy food options—we just needed to ensure we were providing an adequate service.

We quickly found that there were a lot of different things people looked for when it came to healthy food, and that the word healthy was a loaded term, with various meanings for different people.

Aligning expectations

Aligning expectations

The team and I began brainstorming ideas and laying the foundation for how our product could thrive. We developed a set of principles that helped encapsulate our design efforts;

Honest — Dealing with potential data that could cause potential harm if incorrect or misinterpreted, it was imperative that our user experience operated with transparency.

Educate — As the term healthy has many connotations, we wanted to provide a consistent standard of education throughout our product to support our views and beliefs.

Value — We held our users voice with high regard and wanted to ensure our experience radiated how much we care about providing the best service possible.

Premium — Our end-to-end experience should emulate a premium experience.

Being responsible with data

Being responsible with data

When dealing with data that could affect the health of our users (e.g., food allergies), it was imperative that we established clear pathways to access and display this information. Overlooking these details would not only provide a poor experience for our customers, but they could have severe repercussions to their health.

zesty-slide-7.png
zesty-slide-5.png
zesty-slide-4.png
 Upon launching our product, Zesty was featured on  TechCrunch ,  Women's Health  and  The San Francisco Business Journal .  Shortly after the launch, Zesty was accepted into Y Combinator and later  pivoted  to focus on corporate food delivery. In .  Almost one year later, Zesty went on to  raise over $17m  to expanded services to different cities.

Upon launching our product, Zesty was featured on TechCrunch, Women's Health and The San Francisco Business Journal.

Shortly after the launch, Zesty was accepted into Y Combinator and later pivoted to focus on corporate food delivery. In .

Almost one year later, Zesty went on to raise over $17m to expanded services to different cities.